Jumping!

Want to Reduce Jumping Up?

This 3 minute video from Fear Free Happy Homes is a great place to begin.

You Have Choices

Four Feet on Floor

If your dog doesn't yet know any behaviors like sit, touch, down, etc.):

  1. Identify why your dog is jumping up

    1. Many dogs jump on owners and visitors at the door. This is likely for attention or to get close to your face for a friendly doggie-style hello.​

  2. Use this to your advantage as a reward. ​

    1. When you (or your guest comes in), wait until the precise moment when your dog has all four feet on the floor. Give him a treat at just that moment, then pet him and say hello.​

    2. if your dog jumps up again after your greeting, he wants more. So, wait until the moment when all four feet are on the floor and give him exactly what he wants. More attention, pets and treats.

Cue Another Behavior

Use this if your dog has another behavior on cue that is really strong.

  1. Identify why your dog is jumping up

    1. Many dogs jump on owners and visitors at the door. This is likely for attention or to get close to your face for a friendly doggie-style hello.​

  2. Pick the right replacement behavior.​

    1. The behavior that you'll cue will be something already very well known. Your dog should be able to do this behavior during heavy distraction and excitement. Sit and Touch are good choices - but only if your dog will predictably do it when you cue.​

    2. If you don't have a suitable alternate behavior. Work really hard to generalize the behavior you'd like to use by cueing it and reinforcing it in many different situations - walks, near parks, with people around, etc.

  3. When your dog jumps, cue your chosen behavior once. Ignore the dog and wait. When he does the cued behavior reinforce with treats and attention.​

Rules

  • Anytime your dog jumps up to greet, shut down. This means don't look at, speak to or otherwise react to your dog. This is an unintentional reinforcer that will maintain the jumping behavior.

  • Be 100% consistent and sprinkle in some patience. Overriding long-practiced habits takes some time, but your dog will learn your new way to get what he wants. ​